(914) 271-3200

Shop-Rite center
454 South riverside avenue
Croton-on-Hudson NY 10520

Special Shipping Rates

MINIMUM PURCHASE REQUIRED is 6 bottles, MIX and MATCH.All prices listed on this site reflect a minimum 15% discount off our regular low prices.

MIN. $125 purchase per shipment.

All prices listed on this site reflect a minimum 15% discount off our regular low prices.
MINIMUM PURCHASE REQUIRED for these prices is 6 bottles, MIX and MATCH

 SPECIAL SHIPPING RATES
  With a MIN. $125 purchase per shipment you get:
 
FREE SHIPPING in the NorthEast CT DC MA NJ NY VT 
$1 per bottle for GA IL LA MD MI MO NC OH SC TN VA WI  will be reflected before payment processing
$2 per bottle for AZ CA CO ID MT ND NE NM NV OK OR TX UT WA WY  will be reflected before payment processing
A $4.95 Mandatory Adult Signature fee will be added on each order
 
ROSE, BLUSH, PINK, IT'S ALL IN A NAME!

There are three major ways to produce rosé wine: skin contact, saignée and blending.

Skin contact

When rosé wine is the primary product, it is produced with the skin contact method. Black-skinned grapes are crushed and the skins are allowed to remain in contact with the juice for a short period, typically one to three days.The must is then pressed, and the skins are discarded rather than left in contact throughout fermentation (as with red wine making). The skins contain much of the astringent tannins and other compounds, thereby leaving the structure more similar to a white wine.The longer that the skins are left in contact with the juice, the more intense the color of the final wine.

Saignée or bleeding

Rosé wine can be produced as a by-product of red wine fermentation using a technique known as Saignée. When a winemaker desires to impart more tannins and color to a red wine, some of the pink juice from the must can be removed at an early stage. The red wine remaining in the vats is intensified as a result of the bleeding, because the volume of juice in the must is reduced, and the must involved in the maceration is concentrated. The pink juice that is removed can be fermented separately to produce rosé.

Blending

In other parts of the world, blending, the simple mixing of red wine to a white to impart color, is uncommon. This method is discouraged in most wine growing regions, especially in France where it is forbidden by law, except for Champagne. Even in Champagne, several high-end producers do not use this method but rather the saignée method.

Come experience a variety of shades and tastes...
Today, Friday June 1st and Saturday June 2nd, starting at 3pm,
all of our dry roses will be open for sampling... Al Fresco again!
Please come in and invite a friend.



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